Smokies Species Tally

Smokies Species Tally


One of the most exciting elements of the ATBI is the ongoing discovery of organisms that are new to science or are new records for park.

Species Tally Chart Key:

  • "NEW TO SCIENCE": species have never been identified anywhere before.
  • "NEW TO THE PARK": species have never been identified in the Park before.
  • "HISTORIC RECORDS": species known to exist in the park prior to the ATBI.
  • Highlighted Title: this will link you to the scientific taxon page.
  • Highlighted '(map)': a click on these links will take you to a watershed distribution system for all species of this group.

 

(please note)

ORGANISM GROUP HISTORIC RECORDS NEW TO THE PARK NEW TO SCIENCE TOTAL DISCOVERED
Acanthocephala
0 1 0 1
Algae:
358 566 78 1,002
Annelids: Aquatic and Terrestrial Worms & Leeches
22 65 5 92
Arachnids: Opilionids
1 21 2 24
Arachnids: Ixodida
7 4 0 11
Arachnids: Mites
22 227 32 281
Arachnids: Scorpions, etc.
2 15 0 17
Arachnids: Araneae
229 256 42 527
Bryozoa
0 1 0 1
Chilopoda
20 17 0 37
Cnidaria
0 3 0 3
Coleoptera
887 1,580 59 2,526
Collembola
64 129 59 252
Crustaceans: Crayfish - (map) 5 3 3 11
Crustaceans:
10 64 26 100
Dermaptera
2 0 0 2
Diplopoda
38 29 3 70
Diplura
4 5 5 14
Diptera
599 651 38 1,288
Ephemeroptera
75 51 8 134
Fungi
2,157 583 58 2,798
Hemiptera
276 361 3 640
Hymenoptera
245 574 21 840
Isoptera
0 2 0 2
Lepidoptera
891 944 36 1,871
Lichens
344 435 32 811
Mecoptera
15 2 1 18
Microbes: Archaea
0 0 44 44
Microbes: Bacteria
0 206 270 476
Microbes: Microsporidia
0 3 5 8
Microbes: Protists
1 41 2 44
Microbes: Viruses
0 17 7 24
Microcoryphia
1 2 1 4
Molluscs
111 56 6 173
Myxomycetes (now part of Ameobozoa)
128 143 18 289
Nematodes
11 69 2 82
Nematomorpha
1 3 0 4
Nemertea
0 1 0 1
Neuroptera
12 38 0 50
Odonata
58 35 0 93
Orthoptera
65 37 2 104
Orthopteroids (other)
6 7 0 13
Pauropoda
7 25 17 49
Phthiraptera - Lice
8 47 0 55
Plants: non-vascular
463 11 0 474
Plants: vascular
1,598 116 0 1,714
Platyhelminthes
6 30 1 37
Plecoptera
70 48 3 121
Protura
11 5 10 26
Psocoptera
16 52 7 75
Siphonaptera
17 9 1 27
Symphyla
0 0 2 2
Tardigrades
3 59 18 80
Thysanoptera
0 47 0 47
Thysanura
1 0 0 1
Trichoptera
153 82 4 239
Vertebrates: Amphibians
41 3 0 44
Vertebrates: Aves
237 10 0 247
Vertebrates: Fishes
70 6 0 76
Vertebrates: Mammals
64 1 0 65
Vertebrates: Reptiles
38 2 0 40
TOTALS: 9,470 7,799 931 18,200

(figures last updated March 2014)

Consider this ...
1) It is amazing to think there are living things all around us that have gone undetected.
2) Finding new records is just the first step in this ambitious project aiming to document all life forms in the Park.
3) So far, since 1998, we have discovered 926 species new to science and 7,661 species new to the Park.
4) The ATBI provides understanding about distributions of organisms, as well as their abundance and ecological roles in the Park.
5) From this inventory knowledge, the National Park Service builds monitoring, stewardship protection, education, and research efforts, targeting its decreasing resources to the most needy species.

Note: This tally of groups of organisms represents the total of all park records to date. Many of these records are still in the process of being entered into the park Biodiversity (ATBI) database. If you notice that there are more species tallied on this chart than is accessable from the database it is for the above reason. We are all hopeful that the remaining park records, historic and recent, will some day soon be included in, and accessable from the park's Biodiversity (ATBI) database by web users like you, and for more efficient access by the park's living natural resource management staff.

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Thank you for a great 2014 ATBI Conference

Thank you to all who participated in, and attended our annual ATBI Conference of March 2014. We believe it was very profitable: not only for the attendees in general, but for the gathering and collaboration of experts in the field of conservation biology. We were also delighted and enthused by the presence and presentations of our keynote speaker, bat conservationist and author, Dr. Merlin Tuttle.

Thank you Dr. Tuttle!
See Bat Conservation International